Category Archives: Opinion

Moving to Canada may not solve voters’ election dilemma

By Stephanie Salas-Vega
Contributing Writer

 

Some Americans are so disappointed with this year’s presidential election that many have flirted with the idea of leaving the country after the new president is elected. But leaving the country is no easy task. Continue reading

Netflix offers ‘Stranger Things’ than tricks, treats

Critical Review

By Diamond Victoria
Editor-in-Chief

Watercolor illustration by Taylor Starnes

Watercolor illustration by Taylor Starnes

 

Over the past few months “Stranger Things” has become more than just a Netflix Original series. With its soundtrack, visual aesthetics, special effects and cast, it has transcended specific genre norms and is a perfect reason to not leave the couch for an hour, or eight, on Halloween night. Continue reading

Five impactful Godzilla films, one disgrace

Critical Review

By Jubenal Aguilar
Managing Editor

The Toho reboot of the King of the Monsters, “Shin Godzilla,” hit U.S. theaters for a limited run Oct. 11-18. Throughout the franchise’s history, Godzilla’s titular role has gone from destroyer of Japan to savior of mankind and back again. Some films have been heavily politically charged and others overly laid-back, allowing Godzilla’s psyche to be explored. Below are the most impactful films in the franchise.

Illustrations by Jacqueline Arredondo

Illustrations by Jacqueline Arredondo

1. “GOJIRA” 1st film – 1954

The original Japanese production is still the gold standard of the franchise. Godzilla is the living symbol of a nuclear holocaust and a representation of the devastation the two atomic bombs unleashed after Continue reading

Godzilla resurges in Toho reboot, destroys Tokyo

Critical Review

By Jubenal Aguilar
Managing Editor

Illustration by Sophia Espinosa

Illustration by Sophia Espinosa

 

The King of the Monsters returns to the big screen in “Godzilla Resurgence,” directed by Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi, the franchise’s 31st film to unleash chaos and devastation upon Japan. Continue reading

Black cats shadowed by harsh superstition

By Diamond Victoria
Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Diamond Victoria Ichabod Crane gears up to pounce out of his favorite crinkle tunnel.

Photo by Diamond Victoria
Ichabod Crane gears up to pounce out of his favorite crinkle tunnel.

 

Since the Middle Ages, black cats have been shunned, abused and killed in the name of superstition. They are considered bad luck and an omen of death and have been made a popular prop for Halloween Continue reading

‘Dracula’ crosses cultures on screen

Critical Review

By Juan Betancourt
Sports Editor

Illustration by Sophia Espinosa

Illustration by Sophia Espinosa

 

“Dracula,” based on Bram Stoker’s novel of the same name, is one of Universal Studios’ classic monster films. Not only Tod Browning’s English version, but also George Melford’s Spanish version. Continue reading

‘Stranger Things’ composers survive

Critical Review

By Evan Henry
Music Editor

Photo courtesy of S U R V I V E

Photo courtesy of S U R V I V E

 

With the Netflix original series “Stranger Things” shocking audiences almost overnight, it’s no wonder Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein’s esoteric interpretation of electronic music goes far beyond the Continue reading

‘War’ amidst confusion in Syria

Opinion

By Nicholas Bostick
Multimedia Editor-at-Large

 

On Sept. 8, a cease-fire was declared between the Russianbacked forces of Syrian President Bashar Assad and the rebels who’ve fought against his regime since civil war broke out in Continue reading

Banning books harms student experience

By Hannah Meyerhoeffer

Contributing Writer

Photo by Jubenal Aguilar Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read Sept. 25 - Oct. 1.

Photo by Jubenal Aguilar
Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read Sept. 25 – Oct. 1.

 

As censorship becomes an increasingly hotter topic, the Brookhaven College Library staff celebrates literature once considered taboo during Banned Books Week Sept. 25-Oct.1. Some works are barred from some schools because of harsh themes within them. Continue reading

German film examines dictator’s impact

By Diamond Victoria

Editor-in-Chief

couriereic@dcccd.edu

It’s 2014, Adolf Hitler wants to make Germany great again but the citizens of Berlin would rather take selfies with – than take offense to – the former Führer of Nazi Germany. This is the premise of David Nendt’s film, “Look Who’s Back” (Er Ist Wieder Da), starring Oliver Masucci and released in 2015. The comedy is based on the novel of the same name, written by Timur Vermes. Awakening 70 years later in the exact spot where he supposedly committed suicide, a perfectly silhouetted Hitler (Masucci) stumbles through the streets of Berlin, catching the attention of many along his way. Continue reading